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@mycognosist
Re: %NRyFPWbJv

When I mentioned this to the late, great rosarian Margaret Sharp, she said to beat it at night with a broom. Why at night? I asked. So the neighbors won’t see, Margaret said.

I couldn't help thinking of Basil Fawlty giving his car a damn good thrashing :joy_cat:

Young avocado trees can't handle too much sun. As they mature they can handle it.

Cacti are generally very similar in this regard. When I first started raising them from seed I was very surprised at how sensitive the seedlings are to drying out. A humid environment is required for the first year or so and then the young plants can be slowly hardened-off.

We have a young avocado tree here in the fruit forest. It's roughly 1.2m tall and is planted in a 'pocket' of open space surrounded by much larger trees. As a result, it experiences dappled light for most of the day - with some direct sunshine for a few hours. It also seems to enjoy the protection from the wind.

Now that I think of it, I did a wine tour recently, and at one of the farms they explained that their best wine comes from a vineyard grown in the bush style, which is basically untrained, left to itself.

This reminded me of an article I read about dry farming in California:

Is it possible to grow healthy grapes without watering them? Actually, if conditions are right, he says, it’s possible to grow even better ones. Less water means smaller, more intensely flavoured grapes with a higher skin-to-fruit ratio. Other crops – tomatoes, potatoes, squash, corn, apples, even marijuana – can be dry-farmed too, with similarly intensified results.

“The hardest part about dry farming is actually convincing people it works,” Bucklin says. “But in places like Spain, France and Italy, pretty much everybody dry-farms because it makes better wine.” Irrigation has even been banned in parts of Europe to preserve the quality of certain grape varieties. But in California, where irrigation is now the norm, dry farming has become a forgotten art.

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