You are reading content from Scuttlebutt
@substack

avocado census

Our prior attempts at growing avocado from pits haven't done too well. The biggest problem has been excess sunlight stunting and killing the tree. We have 2 stunted avocado trees which are barely alive. One might bounce back but the other has been in stasis for about a year at only 20cm tall and will probably wither away. The other stunted avocado came up out of the compost and got too much light. We transplanted it to a darker location but it seems that once stunted avocado keikis can't easily recover.

Due to these observations, we've started chucking avocado pits into dark areas created by invasive tibouchina bushes. I moved one avocado keiki I grew in a jar of water to one of these areas and it has been doing quite well. That plant was the only viable avocado keiki I knew for sure we had, but today I did a proper census and found 13 healthy young avocado trees, some as tall as 60cm.

#gardening

User has chosen not to be hosted publicly
@bobhaugen

Who knew? too much sun? Too nice conditions?

@substack

Young avocado trees can't handle too much sun. As they mature they can handle it.

User has chosen not to be hosted publicly
User has chosen not to be hosted publicly
User has chosen not to be hosted publicly
@mycognosist

When I mentioned this to the late, great rosarian Margaret Sharp, she said to beat it at night with a broom. Why at night? I asked. So the neighbors won’t see, Margaret said.

I couldn't help thinking of Basil Fawlty giving his car a damn good thrashing :joy_cat:

Young avocado trees can't handle too much sun. As they mature they can handle it.

Cacti are generally very similar in this regard. When I first started raising them from seed I was very surprised at how sensitive the seedlings are to drying out. A humid environment is required for the first year or so and then the young plants can be slowly hardened-off.

We have a young avocado tree here in the fruit forest. It's roughly 1.2m tall and is planted in a 'pocket' of open space surrounded by much larger trees. As a result, it experiences dappled light for most of the day - with some direct sunshine for a few hours. It also seems to enjoy the protection from the wind.

Now that I think of it, I did a wine tour recently, and at one of the farms they explained that their best wine comes from a vineyard grown in the bush style, which is basically untrained, left to itself.

This reminded me of an article I read about dry farming in California:

Is it possible to grow healthy grapes without watering them? Actually, if conditions are right, he says, it’s possible to grow even better ones. Less water means smaller, more intensely flavoured grapes with a higher skin-to-fruit ratio. Other crops – tomatoes, potatoes, squash, corn, apples, even marijuana – can be dry-farmed too, with similarly intensified results.

“The hardest part about dry farming is actually convincing people it works,” Bucklin says. “But in places like Spain, France and Italy, pretty much everybody dry-farms because it makes better wine.” Irrigation has even been banned in parts of Europe to preserve the quality of certain grape varieties. But in California, where irrigation is now the norm, dry farming has become a forgotten art.

User has chosen not to be hosted publicly
@substack

Here are two of them. Some of them are in thick brush and others have more space.

avocado-0.jpg

avocado-1.jpg

@A-pantz

Could it be the side effect of the sun: drying out?
Also nearby plants competing for root space and moisture?

Join Scuttlebutt now